Tag Archives: chiropractic

Do one thing every day that scares you

You know those things in life that scare you?  Those times when it would be far easier to play it safe and stick with what you know, rather than venturing out into the uncertainty of the unknown?  Well, I’ve got a few of those times going on in my life right now.  I love a challenge, and I’ve thrown myself into some exciting potential career opportunities and I’ve also set my sights on a lofty personal athletic goal.  Both of these things scare me.  To death.  But I’m sure that you know, as well as I, that those are precisely the times when we grow.

Luck is where opportunity meets preparation, right?

IMG_6251

Aug/2002; at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) in Toronto.

One of the scariest things I’ve ever done was to move across the country to get my Chiropractic degree in Toronto.  That was 2002, and my twenty-two year-old self knew exactly no one in Southern Ontario.  But I took the plunge, and that spring-boarded me to meeting my husband, many of my best friends, and a career that I love. It was a defining moment in my life, and one that changed my trajectory completely.

IMG_6248

Nov/2007; signing the lease at my new clinic space.

Another pivotal, yet terrifying decision, was selling my clinic in 2010.  I simply couldn’t be everything to everyone; and although the choice to sell the clinic I’d built from nothing and focus on my young son and my family’s priorities was the right one, it was both intimidating and life-changing.  Ultimately, that’s what brought me here, to Burlington Sports & Spine Clinic, where I’ve found the perfect fit.

So, what’s ambition?

FullSizeRender
What’s courage?

FullSizeRender 2

May you have both.  Do one thing every day that scares you, they say?  I say you should also do one thing every so often that terrifies you.

FullSizeRender

Tagged , , , , , ,

“and your back pain is going to go away”

“You know what really helped me?” a patient recently said during her second treatment with me.  “The fact that you told me that my back wasn’t going to go out.

I hear this type of thing often.  This particular patient was suffering with lower back pain, and had a previous history of an exceptionally debilitating episode that made her temporarily unable to care for her two young children.  Her fear level was high.  On her first visit to the clinic, I spent much of our time together talking with her, explaining what was happening to her back, and why she was having pain.  Patient education is patient empowerment.  I did some hands-on manual therapy and then we chatted about rehabilitation exercises and the importance of movement, something that people in pain tend to avoid.  The last words I said to her before she left were along the lines of “don’t worry, you’re going to be fine, and your back pain is going to go away.”  A huge part of my job is patient education, because knowledge is power.

And just so that we’re all on the same page moving forward, backs don’t “go out” and then “go back in,” running does not cause arthritis in your knees, and getting adjusted three times a week for the rest of your life will not prevent stage three spinal degeneration.  Yet these are all proclamations that patients come in and tell me about themselves; these blanket statements are untrue and damaging, and in most cases, patients have been told these things by a health professional.  As chiropractors, and certainly as all healthcare providers, we cannot underestimate the power of our words for the good and for the bad.  If you have a patient’s trust and respect, you have the power to remarkably alter the course of their healing and the perception of their body’s abilities through your words alone.

This is the same reason that medical imaging can often be detrimental; because it affects a patient’s psyche.  Did you know that in many cases, there is actually a very poor correlation between what is shown on a medical image (an X-ray, for example) and a patient’s symptomatology?  But if a patient is shown an x-ray of “degenerative joint disease” (that’s a fancy term for arthritis) in their spine, they will come to believe that they have an arthritic, incapable, dysfunctional body.  This person then tends to become fearful of movement and therefore moves less.  And what creates a perfect storm for unhealthy joints?  Lack of movement.  Herein lies the problem.

Healthcare professionals: please do be careful with your words, and patients: please do be careful of what you listen to.

sticker375x360-u3

Tagged , , , , , ,

Passion

I talk (write) a lot about passion.  I’m an emotional person, so I think it stands to reason that I have many passions for many things.  That’s always been the essence of my blog; passion.  Authenticity.  Genuineness.  Transparency.

When I started this blog in May 2012 (234 posts ago!) my reasoning was that I wanted patients to learn about the real me.  As a chiropractor, my profession is very much based on trust, and I want my patient base to understand who I am as a person, which will hopefully help them to understand who I am as a practitioner.  I think I’ve done that.  I’ve bared my soul here, week upon week, Tuesday upon Tuesday, draft upon draft, post upon post.  My audience has grown exponentially, and I now have several hundred of you following along weekly, liking (or not liking), sharing, discussing, and helping to spread my words through the tangled mess of the internet.  WordPress, the host of this site, regularly sends me readership data, and many Tuesdays I get a notification that says “your stats are booming.”  These alerts are satisfying, because they mean that I’m engaging my audience and making people think.  And the fact that you’re thinking about topics that come from my passion is the whole point.

But I’ve decided to take a step back.

You see, I’m noticing that words are becoming harder for me to find.  My posts are not writing themselves, in my dreams and on my runs and on my yoga mat, as they once did.  I feel like my passion on this blog is being diluted and that defeats my entire purpose.  My purpose here is passion.

So my posts are going to shift slightly, ever so slightly, to maintain that high degree of passion that’s so very important to me.  This isn’t meant to be just another blog, not just another health-tips site, not just another social media tool.  Not to me, anyway.  This is meant to be me, online.  I’m not here to drum up business, I’m not here to grow my Facebook Page, I’m not here to grab page views and link clicks.  I’ve built this online platform as much for me as I have for you, and so I must keep my standards high.  I want to be proud of each and every post and make my honesty and authenticity and yes, passion, glaringly apparent through your screens.  “I love your blogs,” someone said to me this weekend, and I hope she meant “I love your passion,” because that’s my end-game.

For now, instead of a new post every Tuesday, you’re going to get one every second Tuesday.  Not a big shift, perhaps, but a big shift for me, and a recognition that taking a small step back doesn’t mean failure or quitting, labels I’d previously imposed upon myself; it simply means adaptability and not-going-to-settle and hopefully, excellence.

Today you get post #235.  I hope you like it, and I hope you understand my reasoning.  Thank you for your support thus far, and I plan to keep writing with passion well into the years ahead.

c950e244d57a985f69567d1c0ef9ee52

***And if you’ve missed some of my passion over the years, here are my favourites:

Come With Me.

She was there.

Make the trade.

Blizzards and Accomplishments

What they Wish they Would’ve Done

April, May, June

The Search for Skinny

Break the Silence

Sarah Happened

I am a Chiropractor.

 

Tagged , , , , , ,