Online Booking is Here!

Online booking.  Just saying that phrase makes me happy.

This has been an exciting week for me at Burlington Sports & Spine Clinic.  It’s been a long time coming, a lot of research, a lot of discussion around the clinic, and a lot of conversation with colleagues…… and I’ve now ventured into the world of online booking.

We’ve transitioned our clinic software to a new platform, and after more than twelve years of using our old program my learning curve has been steep.  But our reception team has been quick-to-learn and our October 22nd switchover went smoothly, considering all the moving parts of a multi-disciplinary clinic.  With that change successfully under our belts, the next implementation was online booking, a major reason that we made the software change to begin with.

I’m the test case, and we rolled out these patient-centered options this weekend.  My practice has adopted online booking options via four different options:

Many of you have already put these links to work, and I’m glad to see that you’ve jumped on board with this idea.  Of course, we will still have full reception support if you prefer to call or email to book your appointments, but we hope that these changes give you additional, convenient options.

Stay tuned for the rest of the clinic to make the move to online booking, and thank you for sticking with us as we strive to be the very best in patient care and customer service.

 

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I have Thursday guilt.

I have Thursday guilt.

You see, I don’t “work” on Thursdays, at least not officially, not at the clinic.  In fact, I haven’t worked on Thursdays for many, many years.  And at the clinic, we’ve built our practitioner schedule around that; on that day, my treatment rooms are free for the taking by other staff.  Over the years, the clinic has grown into such a busy place that we’re bursting at the seams, and the reality is that we’re now at a point where I wouldn’t be able to work on Thursdays even if I wanted to, because my rooms are full with other practitioner’s patients.

When my daughter began full-time Kindergarten in 2016, joining her older brother in the all-day-school world, I envisioned lazy Thursdays of long runs and naps, hot coffee and newspapers.  Fast forward more than two years and I think I’ve taken a nap once.  Once in about 112 Thursdays.  Because the reality is, Thursdays are usually my busiest day of the week.  They’re the days that I get groceries, tidy the house, squeeze in appointments for myself, run errands, arrange coffee dates, and do all the things that my other days do not allow; they’re the days that I do life.

But inevitably, when a patient asks to book in on a Thursday, and I reply that “I don’t work Thursdays,” guilt nags at me.  I’m a people-pleaser, by nature or nurture, and it niggles at my brain when I can’t be all things to all people.  A character fault for sure, and one that I’m working on, but part of me wonders what they think when they hear that my work-week doesn’t include a traditional Thursday.  Now, logic will tell you (and me) that I work more evenings than the traditional work-week and more Saturdays than the traditional work-week, but logic doesn’t always win.  Logic will also point out that I have very carefully constructed my practice life to align with my values, and Thursdays off have given me the space to find balance for both myself and my family.  But again, logic can be easily strong-armed by guilt.

Is guilt a mom thing?  A female thing?  Or just a me thing?   Perhaps it’s a bit of all three, rolled up and exponentially powerful, a wasted emotion that has no positive value.

Do I work Thursdays?

I sure do.

(And even if I didn’t, that would be okay too.)

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Now, we know better.

This is a tale of my mom, and of advances in research and medical treatment.

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Maya Angelou famously said, “Do the best you can until you know better.  Then when you know better, do better.”  This statement can be readily applied to scientific advances in patient care, and in the case of my mother, low back pain.

In the 1980s, when my brother and I were very young, my mom suffered from chronic low back pain.  There was no incident that started her pain, per se, but it was a dull ache that developed into chronic pain over the years.  She was diagnosed with “degenerative disc disease,” and in 1988 had aggressive back surgery, whereby the surgeon fused four of her five lumbar vertebrae together via screws and an eight-inch metal rod.  I have vague memories of visiting her in recovery in an Edmonton hospital, a few hour’s drive from our tiny prairie town of Hughenden, Alberta.  My nine-year-old brain didn’t hold on to many of the details, just that she was in a hospital bed, and I’d never seen my invincible mother, well, not invincible.

She recovered well, and her low back pain was a thing of the past through my ego-centric teenage and young adult years.  And while her history of back pain and surgery didn’t play a conscious role in my decision to become a chiropractor, the irony is not lost on me that I treat patients like her pre-surgical self every day.  I could have helped her, and let me boldly state that she might have avoided back surgery.  You see, she had no radiculopathy (pain down the leg due to pressure on a lumbar spinal nerve), no indicators of disc bulges or herniations, and she was only 38 years old, coincidentally the exact same age that I am now.

However, her back pain is back with a vengeance now, thirty years later.  It’s worsened over the last several years, and she now has trouble being on her feet or sitting for prolonged periods of time, and struggles to lift much more than her youngest 21-lb granddaughter. It’s affecting her quality of life, despite regular rehab exercises guided by yours truly, ergonomic modifications, and other conservative treatment measures.  The thing is, for the last thirty years, her body has compensated for the lack of movement through her lumbar spine, and the segments above and below her fusion now show advanced degeneration.  Her movement patterns have changed, her core muscles have changed, her biomechanics have changed.  Her spine does not move well, and as a cumulative result, she is in pain much of the time.

She’ll tell you she feels lucky.  Lucky that her pain was mostly gone for the last thirty years.  Lucky that the post-surgical ramifications haven’t affected her much until now.  But I’ll tell you that I wish she didn’t have chronic low back pain in the 1980s, because the conservative management today would be far different.

Why do I tell you this?  Because now, we know better.  Now, we do better.  And we are really good at treating low back pain.

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This is similar to my mom’s spinal surgery in 1988, although four of her five lumbar vertebrae are involved.

*** As an aside, I never use the term “Degenerative Disc Disease” as a diagnosis because I think the term creates fear-mongering and patient helplessness.  Words spoken by a medical professional carry power, a power that I do not take lightly.  Improved semantics = improved patient outcomes.  And might I remind you that there is not always a correlation between clinic imaging results and a patient’s symptomatology…..