Tag Archives: health

www.drworobec.com

Please let me introduce myself.  My name is Ashley Worobec, and I’m an Alberta transplant who now calls Burlington, Ontario, home.  I’m a chiropractor, and I’ve been in practice for more than a decade, with special interests in sports injuries and pediatrics.  I have an awesome husband and two great kids and THIS is me.

If you’ve been here for awhile (this blog is going on 5.5 years strong) then you probably already know me, and if you’re new, welcome and I’m glad you’ve come.  This blog, this website, this part-of-who-I-am, was initially established to act as a landing pad for my patients; a place where they could find my opinions, my voice, and what makes me tick.  It’s evolved into thousands of reads per month and a loyal, supportive place to share my thoughts and dreams, but more importantly, I hope it’s provided patients with a glimpse into who I am.

The doctor-patient relationship is built on trust, and it’s always been my theory that if you know me better, you’ll trust me better, and your treatment outcomes will be better.

So…..

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I love my family: There are So Few Years…, Beauty. Babies. Bathrooms., Little Girls and Big Cities

I love to run: Make the Trade, Come with Me, Then the Wheels Came Off

I love my friends: Sarah happened, The World Needs More Girlfriends, 21.1kms of Friendship

I love health and fitness: We’re Creating their “Normal,” 5 x 800m, Burpees and Babies

I love my work: Tough Love, And your Back Pain is Going to Go Away, New Clinic Hours

That’s me in a nutshell.  If you think I’d be a good fit for your healthcare needs, you can find me at Burlington Sports & Spine Clinic, and if you’ve been wanting to share my information with your friends, this post is a good place to start.

Happy Tuesday!

 

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Predatory.

We had an intense Saturday and Sunday at the clinic this past weekend.  It was our second and final weekend of baseline concussion testing, and this meant two extra-long days at work.  My role as a clinician was to conduct station #1, medical history and memory testing; this meant I sat at a computer all day, asking question after question, a new athlete coming through every four to five minutes.

I asked those same questions 111 times over the two days, and to stay sharp and keep my restless legs at bay, I knew I needed to find time for fitness.  With early starts and late finishes, I got up early to put in some miles and bring some welcomed fatigue to my muscles.  I know myself, and I know that I function best if I’ve incorporated some sweat into my day, so out into the 6:00am pre-Autumn blackness I went on Saturday morning.

That’s where my story begins:

I was planning on a 10km run, 5km out-and-back, along my favourite North Shore stretch.  I figured I could catch the sunrise along the Lake Ontario shoreline on my way back home, throw some hills into the mix, and aim for a negative split to satisfy the competitor in me. The streets were quiet as I left my driveway, most of the city still asleep, just how I like it. Early morning is my favourite time of day, like a little portal into peacefulness that can only be accessed through the conviction of an alarm clock.  It’s my reward for getting up, my compensation for lost sleep, my high to start the day.  I ran down the middle of my road, reflective hat on, earbuds in, my only concern being neighbourhood skunks still foraging on sidewalk boulevards.

I ran along the lakefront promenade, the pitch black waters illuminated by the pier and the streetlights, one or two people out, getting an early start on their dog walks.  I felt safe.  In fact, I almost always feel safe running in Burlington; perhaps it’s naïveté, perhaps it’s luck, perhaps it’s because Halton consistently ranks as one of Canada’s safest municipalities.  But I’m not reckless or inattentive and I’m always aware of my surroundings.  I’m not naive enough to believe that dangers are not present for solo female runners, even nestled inside my little community cocoon.

So as I made the turn onto the deserted, shadowy North Shore Boulevard, my senses were heightened and I was aware of my vulnerability. I moved off the sidewalk and back into the middle of the road, away from the darkness and obscurity of front yard shrubbery and blackened driveways. I removed my earbuds so that my hearing wasn’t compromised, and I continued into the deserted dimness of my route. I saw a man ahead, probably 200m from me, staggering along the sidewalk on the South side of the road. He was a big guy, about as tall as my 6’2″ husband, and every few metres he’d jump into the air and swat at overhanging branches before stumbling onward. I pegged him as a University kid, wandering home in a drunken stupor, but my spidey senses tingled. I crossed the expanse of the road completely, running tucked along the wide curb on the North side of the street. He must’ve heard my footfalls, because he stopped, crouched, and pulled the hood of his black jacket tight over his face, tugging at the drawstrings so that only his eyes were visible. He watched intently as I ran by, from that crouched, hunter-like position, and I picked up my pace. I ran fast until I got several hundred metres down the road, frequently turning my head to check behind me, and as I wound along the familiar twists, turns, and hills, my heartrate settled and my pace began to slow.

At 5km I turned around, making my way back home along the road I’d just run, aware that this guy was likely still stumbling Westward. By now, the first taste of the sunrise was peaking through, and a few cars were beginning to pass by. I chose to head back the way I’d come, not feeling directly threatened, but slightly wary nonetheless.

This is the point of my story that many of you are probably wondering why I didn’t change my route and head home another way.  

Perhaps I should have. In fact, my husband later asked me that very question. But the truth is, I stayed my course, because I knew that this guy wasn’t actually harmful, at least not physically. He was trying to intimidate me, yes. He was being creepy and disturbing, trying to frighten me, trying to show his dominance in a tough-drunk-guy way. But I could see that he was wobbly and the road was wide, and I knew I’d win in a foot-race if it came to that. I also knew that this pathetic wannabe predator would be too scared to cause me any harm as daylight came upon us and people began to stir.

And yes, the same thing happened on my way back home. The same crouch, the same jacket hood pulled low, the same intense, fear-provoking stare. Predatory. That’s what my husband called it when I recounted the story to him at home, and he’s right. This jerk wasn’t trying to hurt me, but he was trying to scare me.  And if I’m being honest, he did.

The feminist in me is angry at the gender roles involved in this scenario- him, the larger, stronger male, and me, the smaller, weaker female.  Meanwhile, the runner in me is angry that he took my power, made me feel vulnerable, and made me question something that I love so much.  As a seventeen-year-old, I moved from a small town to a city to attend University, and I can remember my dad giving me a can of pepper spray.  It’s not until now, two decades later, that I wished I still had it….

dark_road_by_latyrx

 

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60 Adventures in 60 Days: Summer 2017

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To say I’ve had a great Summer would be an understatement.  I’m a chronic over-planner, and my family is always up for adventure, so we cram our Summer FULL of fun.  I’ve published two other Summer-fun lists, in 2013 and 2014, and now my children are eight and five years old, so our exploits and abilities are expanding as they grow.

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We’ve found some incredible hidden gems this year; check out some of our experiences, and keep them in mind for yourselves!

1. BlueJays game on Canada Day.

2. Canada Day fireworks at Spencer Smith Park.

3. Port Dover beach.

4. Golfing at Lowville Golf Club.

5. Both kids playing baseball with BOMBA.

6. Batting cages at Mainway Sports Centre.

7. Tri Kids triathlon at Appleby College.

8. Blood donor appointments at Canadian Blood Services.

9. Hockey Hall of Fame.

10. $5 movies at Cinestarz Burlington.

11. Hot yoga.

12. Honda Indy in Toronto.

13. 11-year anniversary dinner at DiMario’s Trattoria.

14. Half marathon training, including weekly long runs with my wonderful Michaela.

15. Sunday brunch with girlfriends.

16. Royal Ontario Museum.

17. A week at The Wave hockey camp for my son.

18. A week at Pedalheads bike camp for my daughter.

19. Weekly Monday-night dinners with cousins.

20. Monthly book club meetups.

21. Coffee catchups with friends.

22. Regular massage tuneup appointments.

23. CrossFit Kids Saturday morning sessions.

24. Food truck festival.

25. The Donkey Sanctuary, just outside Guelph.

26. Rainbow loom bracelet-making. (Thanks to family and friends who handed down their rainbow-loom supplies a few years after this trend passed; my kids were too young for it  then, but they both love it now.)

27. Fishing (Robert Edmondson Park and LaSalle Park marina).

28. Having nieces and nephews for sleepovers.

29. Evening beachside walks with friends.

30. 1-on-1 Date Days with our kids: BlueJays games, pony rides, Mountainside Pool, and bowling/laser tag at Splitsville.

31. Dinners on downtown patios.

32. Bi-annual optometrist appointments for the kids.

33. Checking out the newly-renovated Nelson outdoor pool.

34. RBC Canadian Open at Glen Abbey.

35. Trips to Central Library.

36. Ottawa!

37. Helping at Wellington Square’s Friday Night Community dinners.

38. Lemonade stand.

39. Family reunion for my mother-in-law’s family.

40. Touch football league games for my husband.

41. Standup paddleboard yoga at Christie Lake.

42. CrossFit classes.

43. Assumption Sports Camp.

44. Bad Axe throwing with the Burlington Sports & Spine team.

45. Disco Dash 10k race.

46. Toronto Island sprint triathlon for my husband.

47. Fit in the Core outdoor yoga class at City Hall.

48. Burlington Children’s festival.

49. Backyard BBQs and fireside chats with wonderful friends.

50. Writing letters to Samuel, our sponsored child through World Vision. (As an aside, this is one of the BEST things we’ve done; we began sponsoring Samuel in the Spring, and we write to him often.)

51. Dinner and arcade games at QB’s Sports Grill.

52.  Family workouts at the Chedoke and Dundurn stairs.

53. A cottage weekend at my sister-in-law’s cottage in Muskoka.

54. Go-carts at Lakeland Kartway.

55. Assumption Football Camp.

56. Zac Brown Band concert at the Budweiser Stage.

57. Regular kid’s visits and chiropractic appointments at Burlington Sports & Spine Clinic.

58. Aspire Climbing gym in Milton (American Ninja Warrior course, climbing walls, and bouldering).

59. Family sleepover at our dear friend’s home in Kitchener.

60. Ribfest.

 

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